Essential Vermeer Newsletter no. 16

November 12, 2005

Exhibitions

FRANS VAN MIERIS (1635–1681)
Mauritshuis, The Hague
from 1 October 2005 – 22 January 2006

Anyone within reasonable distance from The Hague should not pass up the chance to visit this special exhibition. The Mauritshuis has in recent years succeeded in spoiling even the most demanding palettes of Dutch seventeenth-century painting enthusiasts with a brilliant series of exhibitions such as those of Carel Fabritius, Cornelius Gysbrechts and most recently, Vermeer's masterwork The Art of Painting brought from Vienna. The Catalogue offers excellent essays by essays by Otto Naumann, Eddy de Jongh and Quentin Buvelot. All the works of the exhibition are reproduced in state-of-the-art quality.

from the Mauritshuis website:
With utmost diligence and patience Van Mieris painted interiors, scenes from daily life and portraits, primarily in a small format. He made likenesses of well-to-do burghers, famous or important residents of Leiden, and self-portraits and portraits of his wife Cunera van der Cock. He also produced a few history pieces and allegorical scenes. The strength of his work lies in his subtle and remarkable painting technique and palette. The way in which he depicted the various fabrics, materials and textures is nothing short of miraculous: an almost perfect miniature rendering of reality.

website exhibition information:
http://www.mauritshuis.nl/english/index_mieris_explorer.html

other venue:
National Gallery of Art, Washington (26 February-21 May 2006)

THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE AT THE NATIONALMUSEUM
curator: Görel Cavalli-Björkman
Nationalmuseum
Södra Blasieholmshamnen
from 22 September 2005 to 8 January 2006

museum press release:
The 'realist' paintings of the seventeenth-century Netherlands offer a fascinating experience to visitors to this autumn's major exhibition at the Nationalmuseum devoted to The Dutch Golden Age. Masterpieces by Rembrandt, Frans Hals and their contemporaries will be on show from 22 September 2005.The core of the exhibition is provided by the museum's own collections of Dutch paintings and drawings. These have been enriched by loans from other museums, most notably from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Statens Museum for Kunst in Copenhagen and the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. The exhibition comprises some 300 works presented thematically in four galleries and six smaller rooms.

Please read the review of this exhibition by art historian Gary Schwartz at:
http://www.garyschwartzarthistorian.nl/?page_id=96

location:
Nationalmuseum
Södra Blasieholmshamnen
Phone +46 8 5195 4300, fax +46 8 5195 4436
www.nationalmuseum.se

website exhibiton information:
http://www.nationalmuseum.se/NMTemplates/NMSingleExhibition____3747.aspx

Publications

VERMEER AND PLATO; PAINTING THE IDEAL (available at Amazon.com
by Robert H. Huerta

from Bucknell University website:
In a study that sweeps from Classical Antiquity to the seventeenth century, Robert D. Huerta explores the common intellectual threads that link the art of Johannes Vermeer to the philosophy of Plato. Examining the work of luminaries such as Plotinus, Nicholas of Cusa, Saint Augustine, Ficino, Raphael, Keller, Galileo, Descartes, and Hoydens, Huerta argues that the concurrence of idealism and naturalism in Vermeer's art reflects the Dutch master's assimilation of Platonic and classical ideals, concepts that were part of the Renaissance revival of classical thought. Pursuing a Platonic path, Vermeer used his paintings as a visual dialectic, as part of his program to create a physical instantiation of the Ideal. Illustrated. Robert D. Huerta is an independent historian, focusing on the intersection between art and science during the early modern period.

Access this link for an interview with Robert D. Huerta regarding his earlier (excellent) study of Vermeer,
Giants of Delft. Johannes Vermeer and the Natural Philosophers: The Parallel Search for Knowledge during the Age of Discovery, Bucknell University Press, 2003.
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/interviews_newsletters/huerta_interview.htm

On the Net

TWO SPECTACULAR ZOOMABLE IMAGES OF VERMEER PAINTINGS ON THE FRICK COLLECTION WEBSITE

After the renovation of the Rijksmuseum website this year and recently that of the Louvre, the Frick Collection in New York, with its three Vermeer paintings, has decided to follow the trend...with excellent results. Among the most interesting changes for Vermeer enthusiasts are the two zoomable images of the Officer and Laughing Girl and Girl Interrupted in her Music. These scans afford the viewer to inspect the details of each painting which are rarely appreciable in available prints. The rest of the site deserves to be explored as well.

Frick Zoomable Officer and Laughing Girl
http://www.frick.org/education/looking_vermeer.htm

Frick Zoomable Girl Interrupted in her Music
http://collections.frick.org/CUS.18.zoomobject._1009$6858*281066

Frick Collection home page:
http://www.frick.org/

Essential vermeer Website Additions

VERMEER AND VIRGINAL MUSIC

The virginal, an early keyboard instrument similar to the harpsichord with a unique timbre, is portrayed in 3 paintings by Vermeer; The Music Lesson, A Lady Seated at a Virginal and A Lady Standing at a Virginal. Although many Vermeer enthusiasts are familiar with the iconographical significance the various musical instruments which populate Vermeer's interiors, many, including myself, are hardly aware of either the particular sound on these instruments or the type of music which would have been preformed in Vermeer's time, perhaps in his own studio while he was painting. Mr. Joop Klaassen, contributor to the "Stichting Clavecimbel Genootschap Nederland," has graciously recorded three very suggestive pieces of period music. Mr. Klaassen's muselar virginal was built by Louis van Emmerik, after the Ruckers virginals of 1611 in 'Het Vleeshuis,' a museum with a rich collection of musical instruments in Antwerp, Belgium. You may also access each of the three virginals paintings by Vermeer through the site's online catalogue to savor Mr. Klaassen's virginal music while contemplating Vermeer's superb compositions.

Vermeer and Virginal Music
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/music/vermeer_and_virginals.htm

In the News

GREEN LIGHT FOR THE DELFT VERMEER CENTER

The construction of the multimedia center is now well under way. A big building crane is hovering over the buildings both at Voldersgracht and the apartment complex at Vlouw street immediately behind it. The St Lukes Guild construction has progressed upwards from the enormous basement space which is to become a multi-media event hall up to the first floor.

Intended opening time is April or May 2006. 4 floors with a surface area of 950 m2. http://www.vermeerdelft.nl/

Exhibitions

FRANS VAN MIERIS (1635–1681)
Mauritshuis, The Hague
from 1 October 2005 – 22 January 2006

Anyone within reasonable distance from The Hague should not pass up the chance to visit this special exhibition. The Mauritshuis has in recent years succeeded in spoiling even the most demanding palettes of Dutch seventeenth-century painting enthusiasts with a brilliant series of exhibitions such as those of Carel Fabritius, Cornelius Gysbrechts and most recently, Vermeer's masterwork The Art of Painting brought from Vienna. The Catalogue offers excellent essays by essays by Otto Naumann, Eddy de Jongh and Quentin Buvelot. All the works of the exhibition are reproduced in state-of-the-art quality.

from the Mauritshuis website:
With utmost diligence and patience Van Mieris painted interiors, scenes from daily life and portraits, primarily in a small format. He made likenesses of well-to-do burghers, famous or important residents of Leiden, and self-portraits and portraits of his wife Cunera van der Cock. He also produced a few history pieces and allegorical scenes. The strength of his work lies in his subtle and remarkable painting technique and palette. The way in which he depicted the various fabrics, materials and textures is nothing short of miraculous: an almost perfect miniature rendering of reality.

website exhibition information:
http://www.mauritshuis.nl/english/index_mieris_explorer.html

other venue:
National Gallery of Art, Washington (26 February-21 May 2006)

THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE AT THE NATIONALMUSEUM
curator: Görel Cavalli-Björkman
Nationalmuseum
Södra Blasieholmshamnen
from 22 September 2005 to 8 January 2006

museum press release:
The 'realist' paintings of the seventeenth-century Netherlands offer a fascinating experience to visitors to this autumn's major exhibition at the Nationalmuseum devoted to The Dutch Golden Age. Masterpieces by Rembrandt, Frans Hals and their contemporaries will be on show from 22 September 2005.The core of the exhibition is provided by the museum's own collections of Dutch paintings and drawings. These have been enriched by loans from other museums, most notably from the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Statens Museum for Kunst in Copenhagen and the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. The exhibition comprises some 300 works presented thematically in four galleries and six smaller rooms.

Please read the review of this exhibition by art historian Gary Schwartz at:
http://www.garyschwartzarthistorian.nl/?page_id=96

location:
Nationalmuseum
Södra Blasieholmshamnen
Phone +46 8 5195 4300, fax +46 8 5195 4436
www.nationalmuseum.se

website exhibiton information:
http://www.nationalmuseum.se/NMTemplates/NMSingleExhibition____3747.aspx

Publications

VERMEER AND PLATO; PAINTING THE IDEAL (available at Amazon.com
by Robert H. Huerta

from Bucknell University website:
In a study that sweeps from Classical Antiquity to the seventeenth century, Robert D. Huerta explores the common intellectual threads that link the art of Johannes Vermeer to the philosophy of Plato. Examining the work of luminaries such as Plotinus, Nicholas of Cusa, Saint Augustine, Ficino, Raphael, Keller, Galileo, Descartes, and Hoydens, Huerta argues that the concurrence of idealism and naturalism in Vermeer's art reflects the Dutch master's assimilation of Platonic and classical ideals, concepts that were part of the Renaissance revival of classical thought. Pursuing a Platonic path, Vermeer used his paintings as a visual dialectic, as part of his program to create a physical instantiation of the Ideal. Illustrated. Robert D. Huerta is an independent historian, focusing on the intersection between art and science during the early modern period.

Access this link for an interview with Robert D. Huerta regarding his earlier (excellent) study of Vermeer,
Giants of Delft. Johannes Vermeer and the Natural Philosophers: The Parallel Search for Knowledge during the Age of Discovery, Bucknell University Press, 2003.
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/interviews_newsletters/huerta_interview.htm

On the Net

TWO SPECTACULAR ZOOMABLE IMAGES OF VERMEER PAINTINGS ON THE FRICK COLLECTION WEBSITE

After the renovation of the Rijksmuseum website this year and recently that of the Louvre, the Frick Collection in New York, with its three Vermeer paintings, has decided to follow the trend...with excellent results. Among the most interesting changes for Vermeer enthusiasts are the two zoomable images of the Officer and Laughing Girl and Girl Interrupted in her Music. These scans afford the viewer to inspect the details of each painting which are rarely appreciable in available prints. The rest of the site deserves to be explored as well.

Frick Zoomable Officer and Laughing Girl
http://www.frick.org/education/looking_vermeer.htm

Frick Zoomable Girl Interrupted in her Music
http://collections.frick.org/CUS.18.zoomobject._1009$6858*281066

Frick Collection home page:
http://www.frick.org/

Esential Vermeer Website Additions

VERMEER AND VIRGINALS MUSIC

The virginal, an early keyboard instrument similar to the harpsichord with a unique timbre, is portrayed in 3 paintings by Vermeer; The Music Lesson, A Lady Seated at a Virginal and A Lady Standing at a Virginal. Although many Vermeer enthusiasts are familiar with the iconographical significance the various musical instruments which populate Vermeer's interiors, many, including myself, are hardly aware of either the particular sound on these instruments or the type of music which would have been preformed in Vermeer's time, perhaps in his own studio while he was painting. Mr. Joop Klaassen, contributor to the "Stichting Clavecimbel Genootschap Nederland," has graciously recorded three very suggestive pieces of period music. Mr. Klaassen's muselar virginal was built by Louis van Emmerik, after the Ruckers virginals of 1611 in 'Het Vleeshuis,' a museum with a rich collection of musical instruments in Antwerp, Belgium. You may also access each of the three virginals paintings by Vermeer through the site's online catalogue to savor Mr. Klaassen's virginal music while contemplating Vermeer's superb compositions.

Vermeer and Virginal Music
http://www.essentialvermeer.com/music/vermeer_and_virginals.htm

In the News

GREEN LIGHT FOR THE DELFT VERMEER CENTER

The construction of the multimedia center is now well under way. A big building crane is hovering over the buildings both at Voldersgracht and the apartment complex at Vlouw street immediately behind it. The St Lukes Guild construction has progressed upwards from the enormous basement space which is to become a multi-media event hall up to the first floor.

Intended opening time is April or May 2006. 4 floors with a surface area of 950 m2. http://www.vermeerdelft.nl/

Essential Vermeer nEWSLETTERS

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 /11/ 12 / 13 / 14 / 15  16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25 / 26 / 27 / 28 / 29 / 30 / 31 /32 / 33 / 34 / 35 / 36 / 37 / 38